The Girl on the Train PDF Book by Paula Hawkins PDF ePub

The Girl on the Train

by Paula Hawkins
3.91 • 1,793,061 votes • 105,854 reviews
Published 13 Jan 2015
The Girl on the Train.pdf
Format Hardcover
Pages323
Edition232
Publisher Riverhead Books
ISBN -
ISBN13-
Languageeng



The Girl on the Train Ebook Description

The Girl on the Train PDF Book has good rating based on 1793061 votes and 105854 reviews, some of the reviews are displayed in the box below, read carefully for reference. Find other related book of "The Girl on the Train" in the bottom area.

Alternate cover edition of ISBN 9781594633669
Rachel catches the same commuter train every morning. She knows it will wait at the same signal each time, overlooking a row of back gardens. She's even started to feel like she knows the people who live in one of the houses. 'Jess and Jason', she calls them. Their life - as she sees it - is perfect. If only Rachel could be that happy. And then she sees something shocking. It's only a minute until the train moves on, but it's enough. Now everything's changed. Now Rachel has a chance to become a part of the lives she's only watched from afar. Now they'll see; she's much more than just the girl on the train...

The Girl on the Train Reviews

Holly
- Egg Harbor Township, NJ
1
Tue, 13 Jan 2015

What a huge disappointment.
The concept sounded amazing, and it got off to a promising...if slow...start. But it quickly turned into this messy, melodramatic story that was neither surprising, or original. Much like in Gone Girl, there was not a single likable character in the entire book. That wasn't the main problem for me, though. I could see the ending coming from a mile away. Actually more like I figured out who the main villan was within the first 20 pages. Never a ringing endorsement.

Alexandra
- New York, NY
1
Tue, 13 Jan 2015

Depressing from start to finish. Most every single character was a hot mess. I have literally no idea why there are so many 5 star ratings. It kind of scares me. If this kind of garbage is what the masses find appealing...I mean..
I didn't care at all about the "mystery." It didn't even feel like there was one. It just felt like a tedious glimpse into the messed up lives of people I'd rather not know anything about.

Shelby *trains flying monkeys*
- The United States
2
Tue, 10 Mar 2015

I read this book due to the fact that everyone else read it.
Yes, mom I would jump off the cliff right behind everyone else.
These are some fucked up characters. I think the new trend in books where every one of the characters is an asshole may be the way to go if you are writing a book that you want to take the world by storm with. The thing is...It gets frigging boring. I wanted a bus to hit them all. Repeatedly.
May go sorta spoilery:
You have Rachel. Rachel is a drunk, she gets on the 8:04 train every morning and then on again in the afternoon on her way home. Pretending to go to work. (She got fired for drinking and basically acting a damn fool)..so she goes on that same train every day.
Sometimes she can't wait to take a drink before she gets home.
She sees "Jess and Jason" everyday. Or that's what she calls them in her head. They live near her old home. Where she lived with her ex-husband (who cheated on her). Coincidence? I think not.
She sees Jess kissing a guy that isn't Jason. So her little mind starts to working. Then Jess aka Megan goes missing.
Rachel then decides to go to the police with what she knows. Then the police find out she is not the most reliable of witnesses and tell her to stay out of it. Of course, that's not happening.
Now for the twist. That one I saw coming and kept thinking "no way" it can't be that easy. This book wouldn't be so popular.
I need to stay away from super, duper popular books.
Because, I'm just calling Bullshit.
The writing is not bad in this book, so I'm not giving it the rating for that. I'm giving it the rating because I personally hated it.
#trollscankissmyfatass

Emily May
- The United Kingdom
4
Mon, 29 Sep 2014

"Something bad happened."

Are you ready for a faster-paced, creepier Gone Girl?
Woah. This is one unsettling little thriller and the best bit about it is that no one can be trusted, including the three female narrators who share the storytelling of this book. I literally read this entire novel in one sitting and I now need to find the words to convince you to go get your hands on it. RIGHT NOW.
Between an alcoholic, a liar and a cheat, who can you trust? These are the three women at the centre of this book: Rachel, Anna and Megan.
Have you ever sat on the train, glanced at the people around you or out of the window, and made up stories about them? Maybe you've even gone so far as to invent names for these people and imagine their perfect or not-so-perfect lives.
Rachel is that girl on the train who takes her mind off her own life by imagining the lives of others. Specifically the lives of "Jess and Jason" who live at the house outside her train window when the train stops at the same red signal every morning. But then one morning, things are not as they are supposed to be and Rachel sees something that completely shatters the "Jess and Jason" image which exists in her head.
Now she is pulled into their lives. Unsure exactly what she knows but certain she cannot rest until she finds out.
This book is just full of secrets. Everyone has them. It's about all the little mysteries that exist just outside of what we see on the surface. What goes on behind closed doors? How much can you ever really know a person? What horrors exist in that black spot of your memory from Saturday night?
It was fascinating, gripping and oh so very creepy. Hawkins has been added to the small group of thriller authors on my "must buy" list.
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karen
- Woodside, NY
4
Sat, 27 Sep 2014

I once read a book by a former alcoholic where she described giving oral sex to two different men, men she'd just met in a restaurant on a busy London high street. I read it and I thought, I'm not that bad. This is where the bar is set.
oh, yeah - this one is going to be a must-read for those people looking to find their next Gone Girl experience. it's an incredibly fast-paced and engrossing psychological thriller, and i was on board as soon as i read the editor's bit of ARC-copy, even though i know that writing those things is part of the job and not at all unbiased. but it's hard not to be swayed when you read:
Within days of my introducing the manuscript in March, people from every department were regularly pulling me aside to testify to how much they loved the read, how they couldn't put it down. At a recent meeting, a colleague who was twelve pages from the end was secretly reading them under the table because she could not stop. Another had the manuscript propped up next to her phone so she could read between calls, and last week in the elevator, people around me suddenly started competing over who'd read it fastest, and who was more surprised by the ending. You know you have something special when it becomes watercooler talk for months on end.
it would take a very stubbornly cynical person to see that as anything other than genuine enthusiasm.
and the book definitely delivers. it is an absolute page-turner with a number of unreliable narrators ranging from the self-deluded to the spotty memory of the blackout drunk.
i am too busy reading on my daily commute to notice my fellow passengers unless they are smelly/behaving in an unstable manner (frequently), or exceptionally attractive (MUCH less frequently), but apparently this is a thing that commuters do - notice their fellow travelers, making up stories about their lives, speculating about what they do when they're not in the in-between moments of their day. and rachel does it more than most. rachel is blisteringly lonely, drowning the sorrows of her failed marriage with grim determination and canned gin and tonics and endless bottles of wine. she has lost her job because of her perpetual drunkenness, but rather than tell her flatmate, she keeps taking the train into london every day, pretending to go to work, but actually just getting drunk in various places, and happily fantasizing about the young couple she watches every day from her train window; a couple who live a few doors down from her old house, where her ex-husband tom still resides with his new wife and baby girl.
still reeling from tom's infidelity to her, she nonetheless would love to be back with him, and in this golden couple she observes and imagines, calling them "jess and jason," she sees the life she could have had with tom. one day, while commuting/gazing voyeuristically, she witnesses "jess" on her front lawn with another man, in what appears to be a romantic clinch. she is outraged at this display, as personally offended as if the infidelity were being committed against herself. shortly after this episode, she learns that "jess," actually named megan, has disappeared, and feeling connected to this couple she has never actually met, she insinuates herself into the investigation, meeting with both the police and megan's husband, actual name scott.
the story is told from three perspectives: rachel's, megan's, and tom's new wife anna, and covers all the traditional viewpoints of the typical domestic drama: the jilted lover, the other woman, the cheating wife. all three of these women are simultaneously sympathetic and repellent, which is tricky to pull off. and as for the mystery of megan's disappearance itself, well that path splits and splits again in a wonderful head-spinning journey where not a single character avoids suspicion (except MAYBE tom and anna's infant daughter); i think there are seven characters in total who appear to be the culprit at one point or another, and each seems as plausible as the next. it is a fantastic ride, and hawkins does a great job with both the mystery elements and the character development, with great attention to detail, and fully established backstories and motivations. even when you cringe at some of the choices, they completely make sense for the character. it is a lot of fun, and terribly addictive. much better than a meeting, i kid you not.
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