Gentle Birth, Gentle Mothering: The Wisdom and Science of Gentle Choices in Pregnancy, Birth, and Parenting PDF Book by Sarah J. Buckley PDF ePub

Gentle Birth, Gentle Mothering: The Wisdom and Science of Gentle Choices in Pregnancy, Birth, and Parenting

by Sarah J. Buckley
3.98 • 780 votes • 100 reviews
Published 28 Jan 2005
Gentle Birth, Gentle Mothering: The Wisdom and Science of Gentle Choices in Pregnancy, Birth, and Parenting.pdf
Format Paperback
Pages0
Edition5
Publisher One Moon Press
ISBN 0975807706
ISBN139780975807705
Languageeng



Gentle Birth, Gentle Mothering: The Wisdom and Science of Gentle Choices in Pregnancy, Birth, and Parenting Ebook Description

Gentle Birth, Gentle Mothering: The Wisdom and Science of Gentle Choices in Pregnancy, Birth, and Parenting PDF Book has good rating based on 780 votes and 100 reviews, some of the reviews are displayed in the box below, read carefully for reference. Find other related book of "Gentle Birth, Gentle Mothering: The Wisdom and Science of Gentle Choices in Pregnancy, Birth, and Parenting" in the bottom area.

An authoritative guide to natural childbirth and postpartum parenting options from an MD who home-birthed her own four children.
Sarah Buckley might be called a third-wave natural birth advocate. A doctor and a mother, she approaches the question of how a woman and baby might have the most fulfilling birth experience with respect for the wisdom of both medical science and the human body. Using current medical and epidemiological research plus women's experiences (including her own), she demonstrates that what she calls "undisturbed birth" is almost always healthier and safer than high-technology approaches to birth. Her wise counsel on issues like breastfeeding and sleeping during postpartum helps extend the gentle birth experience into a gentle parenting relationship.

Gentle Birth, Gentle Mothering: The Wisdom and Science of Gentle Choices in Pregnancy, Birth, and Parenting Reviews

Emma
- Edinburgh, U8, The United Kingdom
4
Sun, 14 Jan 2018

I read this book in a few days because it was due back to the library and I couldn’t renew it again (nothing like someone else having a hold on a book to make you read through it at top speed!). I didn’t read it word for word, since most of the content was comprised of studies and statistics in support of concepts I already know of. But I got a lot of value from the book as a whole, especially in the checklists at the end of each chapters to summarise learnings and suggestions.
Thanks for reminding me how powerful this experience is!

Melissa
- Australia
3
Fri, 09 Jan 2015

Some aspects of this book were brilliant - I found the explanations of hormones and body chemistry to be incredibly interesting.
Having even a rudimentary understanding of how our bodies are intelligently designed to facilitate birth made me feel much more comfortable with my decision to attempt a completely natural birth. This alone made the book worth reading to me.
I did find that there were sections that were a bit repetitive throughout the book. I also felt a bit disconnected from some of her more 'spiritual' chapters, as I felt that she swung from medically technical to uber alternative/spiritual quite dramatically from one chapter to the next.
Overall some very interesting information, even if it did not all resound completely with me.

Bucket
- Portland, OR
4
Fri, 10 Feb 2017

This was good food for thought. There are some areas where there's new research and it could use an update, but overall I appreciated the focus on evidence-based practice.
The author shared all sides of the research and freely admitted she has biases but I was still struck by how obviously biased her choice of when to emphasize the tininess of a risk was. If she was talking about a medical intervention (like antibiotics for Group B strep during delivery), she'd simply state the risk that antibiotics have. If she was talking about not using an intervention, though, she'd often state the associated risk and then have a sentence emphasizing how few people that really means are affected (1 in 2000, etc). In reality, many of the risks she talked about for medical interventions that are evidence-based had similarly low numbers of people affected by them. Anyway, this was pretty transparent and easy to get past.
Overall, a helpful review of literature coupled with her personal stories (they aren't all realistic for most of us, who aren't medical professionals or wealthy enough to stop working and breastfeed for four years), and definitely worth an update to include new research!

Jess
- Iowa City, IA
3
Thu, 18 May 2017

I like parts of this book a lot, like the details about the hormones during labor. They were unique from other things I've read and seemed factual and well researched. I had to skip chapters about her home births and the dangers of ultrasounds. This woman is a doctor and delivered her fourth baby breech in the bathtub with no attendants--not something I can relate to or desire for baby's birth. Also I try to steer clear of anything that comes off as "oh god how could you do this to your baby" instead of calm and rational explanations of benefits versus risk, so I don't read chapters titled "The dangers of x..."

Abby
- The United States
2
Thu, 21 Mar 2019

Too kooky for my taste (par ex.: Buckley decides to let her fourth baby tell her, via dreams, what she needs and avoids any medical attention and then delivers a footling breech baby at home with no attendants but her husband and children), but I liked many of her perspectives overall. Not necessarily a book I’d recommend; most of it comes across with that weird judgmental tone that ekes out of so many hippies.

Related Books of "Gentle Birth, Gentle Mothering: The Wisdom and Science of Gentle Choices in Pregnancy, Birth, and Parenting"