Predators: Pedophiles, Rapists, And Other Sex Offenders PDF Book by Anna C. Salter PDF ePub

Predators: Pedophiles, Rapists, And Other Sex Offenders

by
4.21636 votes • 77 reviews
Published 31 Mar 2004
Predators: Pedophiles, Rapists, And Other Sex Offenders.pdf
Format Paperback
Pages288
Edition11
Publisher Basic Books
ISBN 0465071732
ISBN139780465071739
Languageeng



(...)in the creative ways they exclude their children from the discussion.
"You're so right," they say: "Sexual abuse is an enormous problem, particularly for young teens. Thank God mine aren't there yet."
No, sorry, says reality, the most common age at which sexual abuse begins is three.
"Well sure, if you have homosexuals around small children, there's a risk."
No, sorry, says reality, most sexual abuse is committed by heterosexual males.
"Yeah, but that kind of pervert isn't living in our neighbourhood."
Sorry, says reality, but that kind of pervert IS living in your neighbourhood. The Department of Justice estimates that on average, there is one child molester per square mile in the United States.
"Well, at least the police know who these people are."
Not likely, says reality, since the average child molester victimises between 50 and 150 children before he is ever arrested (and many more after he is arrested).
When all defenses against reality are taken away, some parents switch to resignation, literally resigning from responsibility: "Well, there's nothing you can do about it anyway." This misplaced fatalism actually becomes fatal for some children.
Another common refrain uttered by deniers of the dangers of sexual abuse is: "Well, kids are resilient. When bad things happen, they bounce back."
Absolutely not, says reality. Children do not bounce back. They adjust, they conceal, they repress, and sometimes they accept and move on, but they don't bounce back..

(From the foreword written by Gavin de Becker)

Predators: Pedophiles, Rapists, And Other Sex Offenders Reviews

Ashlee
- Salem, OR
3
Sat, 05 Dec 2009

While I don't think many mothers would add this to their list of light reading - I SUGGEST YOU DO! There is no better defense than a good offense and knowing how to protect yourself and your children is so important. While I know this book may not sound like the greatest thing to read, I think it's more important than a lot of other books. Please at least just consider it. It's a quick read filled with lots of information, examples and ways to protect your children...just read it.

Stacy
- Wyoming, MI
5
Tue, 03 Jun 2014

This book had a lot of new information in it. I know we all hear about these things in the news, but how much do we really know? Is it enough to keep you safe? This book answers those questions.
It starts with information on the offenders and how they got away with it for so long, and how they finally got caught. The scary part is how long most of them got away with it. And how many people they victimized before they were locked up.
At the end of the book is information on how to spot someone who would take advantage of you, or your kids. This is so helpful. Because some of these people do not think anything like what we would consider normal, and if they think a different way then the things you look for to spot a normal lier are not going to help you with them.

Christy
5
Thu, 21 Nov 2013

Anna Salter is a very good, engaging author with terrifically graphic descriptions of how these people think, react, and plan. While this is an upsetting book to read, it should be required reading if you work with children. For parents, the best part of the book is the last 20 pages. While detecting lies and dangerous people is extremely difficult and chancy, deflecting abusers from your children sounds relatively easy. First, be involved in your child's life--know the coaches, go to your kids' games and practices, be a chaperon on overnights, watch their online accounts, etc. Keep your kids close and know that anyone in a high risk group--those that work with kids, have no adult love interests, and are focused on your child--could be a predator. Second, develop safety plans/habits that make you aware--alarms, no walking at night, closing your curtains, etc. Third, don't display your child for outsiders. No pictures in the workplace, no personal details on Facebook, Google or Twitter. Fourth, talk about internet, stranger, and family safety. Sometimes Uncle Bilbo makes your stomach feel uneasy. This is something you should pay attention to.
I've gone one further and my family is in self defense classes. While this doesn't protect them from all harm, it at least gets us talking about safety. Good luck to you and your family. But don't think you are immune to predators. They are out there and no one, not even experts, can tell who they are.

Serina
- The United States
4
Tue, 15 Aug 2017

In spite of the old adage, I was a bit concerned this book would be sensationalist from its cover and striking name, but I was very happy to find that it is not only grounded but more informative than I expected.
Salter's "Predators" is a straightforward guide for the average person about how to deal with predators, primarily child molesters, not only giving the basics that most people with a passing interest in criminology will already know, but also a lot of information that will come as a surprise to the latter group as well. While many of the debunked myths in the book's description were already well known to me, I was shocked more than once about how badly "common knowledge" about predatory people had mislead me — for example, how there is no evidence to suggest that most child molesters were molested themselves despite this being constantly repeated. Salter takes a hard, no-nonsense approach to this subject; she isn't just here to make us feel good about ourselves by trashing on predators as many similar books do, but to dispel the false confidence that most of us have about our ability to detect and combat them. The book can easily be described as cynical, but it is that way for a very good reason. This isn't a subject where one can afford to feel comfortable.
Several of the informative highlights include:
—Showing just how disturbing of a history pedophilia has; how it was widely justified by our ancestors, and how it's justified by more people than we think to do.
—How pedophilia and its origins are much more poorly understand than many of us think.
—An in depth look at humans' abysmal record with being able to detect lies and deception.
—The way our overestimation of our ability to "fight back" (with things like self-defense and gun classes) often puts us at more risk, as they rely on a specifically sensationalist and almost nonexistent predatory scenario that most predators are not stupid enough to use.
—How people who are outwardly the most radical anti-predator are often the ones most easily tricked by predators.
—How predators justify their actions to themselves.
The book manages to be packed full of evidence and good science while also accessible to the average person, making it a must-have guide for parents, teachers, and anyone with an interest in protecting themselves and others.

Jim
- Sacramento, CA
5
Fri, 25 Dec 2015

Predators: Pedophiles, Rapists, And Other Sex Offenders
Anna C. Salter, PhD
This is a very good mix of theory, data, psychology, and first person narrative.
But the subject is a slippery one. For those who just want the bottom line, the bottom line will not help. One has to get rid of all the mental garbage that gets in the way of understanding. Then understand a new reality. Then, maybe, the bottom line is for you.
Notes while reading:
0. Forward by Gavin de Becker


If a discussion requires exploration of harsh truths some parents will try to wriggle away.
"Talking about these things, you just bring them on," or
"Yes, I know about all that stuff; can we please change to a happier subject?"
[...]
"Sexual abuse is an enormous problem, particularly for young teens. Thank God mine aren't there yet."
No, sorry, says reality, the most common age at which sexual abuse begins is three.
"Well, sure, if you have homosexuals around small children, there's a risk."
No, sorry, says reality, most sexual abuse is committed by heterosexual males.
"Yeah, but that kind of pervert isn't living in our neighborhood."
Sorry, says reality, but that kind of pervert is living in your neighborhood.
The Department of Justice estimates that on average, there is one child molester per square mile in the United States.
"Well, at least the police know who these people are."
Not likely, say reality, since the average child molester victimizes between 50 and 150 children before he is ever arrested (and many more after he is arrested).
[...]
"Well, there's nothing you can do about it anyway."
[...]
"Well, kids are resilient. When bad things happen, they bounce back."
Absolutely not, says reality. Children do not bounce back. They adjust, they conceal, they repress, and sometimes they accept and move on, but they don't bounce back.

page ix-x
0. Introduction
- under-reporting
- "Sex offenders only very rarely sneak into a house in the middle of the night. More often they come through the front door in the day, as friends and neighbors, as Boy Scout leaders, priests, principals, teachers, doctors and coaches."
1. The Problem
- One survey result: 232 molesters attempted 55,000 attempts, clamed 38,000 incidents, on more then 17,000 victims.
- Another survey: 561 offenders, more then 291,000 offenses, more then 195,000 victims.
2. Deception
- People just do not believe it is happening.
- He is so nice and considerate, he couldn't be a molester.
- Respected member of our society/church/group/...
- The child is not believed, even with creditable accounts.
3. Techniques of Deception
- The double life. Straight, nice, talented, religious vs. a molester.
- Deceptions one on one.
-- look a person in the eye when lying.
-- have an element of truth in your lies.
-- setup a pattern that supports the molestation. eg: repeated visits might suggest an existing affair when none exists.
-- groom the family, groom the kid. Be their good friend.
4. Child Molesters

"... it is a misconception that child molesters are somehow different from the rest of us, outside their proclivities to molest. They can be loyal friends, good employees, and responsible members of the community in other ways."
"People often confuse issues of traits of character with issues of sexual orientation or the type of sexual interest an individual has."

- The author refutes early theories of "blame the victim" and no harm.
- Are molesters caused by being molested at an early age? The author points out that molesters will lie, if it benefits themselves. Also, it is satisfying to establish a cause-effect relationship. So, not likely, but not proven.
- "... this problem had a persistence and a compulsiveness that few outside the drug addition world could appreciate."
5. Rapists
- Opportunistic
- Compulsive
- Distorted thinking
- The fantasy and the act
6. Sadists
- Feed off the pain of others.
- Like a drug; must increase the intensity.
7. Psychopaths: Fooling People for the Thrill of It
- Predators, but not necessarily sexual predators.
- "If violence was all, psychopaths would simply be thugs."
- "... they have personality traits which allow them to manipulate people pretty much with impunity."
- generally likable.
- "... their lying and manipulation are just to difficult to detect."
- An Old Problem: the author details Alcibiades, 400 BCE, as an early example.
- the author also describes how a present day psychopath is able to con others from a prison cell.
8. Staff Seductions
- Manipulation of prison staff by inmates.
- Obtain information about staff. Often verbally.
- Overhear staff conversations.
- Behavioral observations.
- Target selection.
- Tactics of seduction: the role of reciprocity.
- The demand and the lever.
9. Rose-Colored Glasses and Trauma
- Self-Regard: The average person is better than the average person.
- Having too few doubts.
- Personal control over events.
- The world is a pretty nifty place.
-- Table 9.1, Lifetime Exposure to Trauma in Four U.S. Cities
-- versus estimates by individuals
-- big difference
- A just world.
-- Is it really just?
-- What about randomness?
-- and badness?
- Impact of positive illusions on mental and physical health.
-- Often helpful.
- The Impact of trauma.
-- several examples:
-- Jonathan was sexually abused at a day-care facility.
-- His world view was majorly affected. He expected bad things to happen to him, and that he would die young.
-- Chowchilla, California school bus capture:
The behavior of the kids was a clue to what was little understood in 1976, that trauma that did not leave physical scars could leave emotional ones that would prove longer lasting and harder to heal.
-- One researcher described the result as massive interferences with optimism and trust.
-- Life after trauma ... is not just different emotionally, it is different cognitively.
-- ... documented systematic changes in the victim's sense of how meaningful, orderly, and predictable the world is.
10. Detecting Deception
- There are no checklists we can use to spot a predator.
- We need to understand our illusions, some are healthy, some are OK in general but not in specific.
- eg: most people are good. But, is _this_ person good?
- Detection
-- What doesn't work: gaze aversion and fidgeting
-- "All liars ... respond in some way to a consideration of the stakes and are also affected by their confidence level."
-- "... the response that conventional wisdom tells us to expect - shame, guilt, nervousness - will not necessarily be there."
-- Detection apprehension may be high or low. Practice and success will improve a predators method and decrease apprehension.
- Emotional Leakage
-- There are no signs of deception, just of emotional leakage, and these are subtle.
-- Facial Expressions
--- Micro expressions
--- Squelched expressions
--- Automatic expressions
--- Smiles
--- Asymmetry
--- Timing
--- All the above are difficult to catch 'live'; more easily spotted on video.
-- Illustrators, ie, talking with one's hands.
--- Must have a baseline, then look for less or more usage.
-- Emblems, self-explanatory, do not require words, are consciously made.
--- examples: thumbs up, hitch-hiking, "the finger".
-- Voice characteristics
--- not words
--- pitch, rhythm, stumbling over words, repeating, ...
--- variations within population can be misleading.
--- Ekman study: combo of voice measures and facial analysis gave best results for detecting deception.
--- But, need video analysis, not live session.
-- Words
--- Evasive answers
--- Disharmony
- bottom line: detection is not good enough, even by experts; and the average person is not an expert.
11. Protecting Our Children and Ourselves: Deflecting Sex Offenders
- pay attention to probabilities and avoid high-risk situations.
-- high risk: a man who works with kids, the kids are often of the same age and sex, he has no adult love interest, offers gifts, has overnights.
--- monitor sports practices. a pedophile will focus on someone else.
--- pedophiles go where the opportunity exists: sports, religion, education, male choirs, ...
--- Dating
---- How much does one really know about another? Has all that info been supplied by the other one.
---- Have a third person there initially.
-- low risk: avoid 'low risk' and 'no reward' situations.
--- eg: a photo of your child on your desk at work.
-- carry a mobile phone.
-- have deadbolt locks
-- maybe a dog

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